The Mitchell Team | Berverly Real Estate, Salem Real Estate, Gloucester Real Estate

As a home seller, it sometimes can be tough to balance short- and long-term goals. Lucky for you, we're here to help you streamline your house selling efforts and ensure you can maintain your focus as you proceed along the property selling journey.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you stay on course after you list your residence.

1. Establish a Home Selling Timeline

A home selling timeline can help you take the guesswork out of selling your residence. This timeline enables you to determine what tasks you will need to complete as you navigate the property selling journey. Plus, it can help you get a good idea about how much time you will need to sell your residence.

Be flexible with your home selling timeline. Remember, unexpected problems may arise at any point during the home selling journey, and these issues may slow you down. But if you maintain flexibility, you can address any potential home selling hurdles and finish the home selling journey as quickly as possible.

2. Create Home Selling Goals

With home selling goals in place, you can achieve many milestones throughout the property selling journey. These goals can help you stay focused as you complete each step of the home selling process. They also enable you to enjoy a sense of accomplishment as you finish a wide range of tasks when you sell your home.

You can create as many or as few home selling goals as you'd like. As you set up goals, you should consider the steps that you'll need to complete as well. This may allow you to further accelerate the home selling journey.

3. Work with a Real Estate Agent

If you are unsure about what to expect during the home selling journey, you may want to find a real estate agent. Because if you have a real estate agent at your side, you can get the help you need to maintain your focus throughout the property selling journey.

A real estate agent understands exactly what it takes to sell a home in any real estate market, at any time. First, he or she will help you establish a home selling strategy. This housing market professional next will promote your residence to potential buyers and help you review any offers to purchase your home. And if you accept an offer to purchase, a real estate agent will make it simple for you to complete the final steps of the property selling journey.

Let's not forget about the expert guidance that a real estate agent provides, either. A real estate agent is happy to respond to a home seller's concerns and questions. As a result, a real estate agent will help a home seller make informed decisions as the property selling journey progresses.

Maintain your focus as you sell your home – use the aforementioned tips, and you can remain on track throughout the house selling journey.

Whether you've recently purchased a new home or are in the process of doing so, one of the most satisfying aspects of becoming a homeowner is customizing your living space.

Half the fun of moving into a new home is "making it your own," which can include everything from painting the walls to remodeling the kitchen.

Although it may feel a little odd at first to move into what was recently "someone else's house," it won't take long before you and your family feel a sense of belonging and pride. In many cases, that feeling is instantaneous. While there are dozens of things you can do to create a feeling of coziness, comfort, and security, here are a few tips worth keeping in mind.

Empty those moving boxes. Once the moving crew leaves, the first thing many people do is take a deep sigh of relief and order a pizza -- and why not! If you have all your immediate essentials packed in separate, clearly labeled boxes, then there's no urgent need to set up your household right away. Relax, take in your new surroundings, and enjoy the accomplishment of purchasing and moving into a new home! Once you've taken that initial breather and acclimated yourself to your new living space, however, getting organized and unpacked is one of the next orders of business. If you leave stuff in boxes for more than a week or two, it may delay your feeling of being "settled in."

Add your own decorating touches. If your walls seem sterile, stark, or empty looking, two solutions immediately come to mind: Consider changing your paint color to a warmer shade and hang up some framed paintings or pictures that reflect your personality. In addition to wall art you already own, there are several websites and well-known retail outlets that can help you update and personalize your home décor. Over time, you can also check out local art exhibits, antique shows, and craft fairs.

Landscaping: Depending on the season and the climate in which you live, planting colorful flowers, bushes or ornamental trees can help beautify your property and make it feel like your own. Hedges and fencing can also enhance your sense of privacy and create a backyard retreat that's ideal for relaxing and entertaining.

Security matters: Regardless of how safe and secure your new neighborhood seems, it's always better to be safe than sorry! Since you don't know how many people may have been given keys to your house, such as housekeepers, contractors, neighbors, or friends of the previous owner, it makes sense to change the locks on your doors, as soon as possible. You may also want to do a security audit, which might include testing your window locks and trimming shrubbery that covers windows. Installing a couple motion detector lights in strategic places is another home security measure that can increase your peace of mind and make your new house feel more like a home.

Decorating a home is no simple task. You have to consider the architectural style of the house,  how to best use the space to avoid clutter, and to give the home a sense of cohesion and continuity across the rooms.

Professional interior decorators attend school and earn degrees and certificates that help them make these difficult decisions. After all, things like furniture and appliances are expensive items--you don’t want to spend a lot of money on items only to decide later that they don’t go well together.

If you don’t have plans on hiring or becoming an interior decorator, there are a few simple rules you can follow to make sure your home has its own tasteful appearance and atmosphere.

Whether you’re buying your first home, redecorating your current home, or staging a home you hope to sell, these tips will help you create a look that will leave an impression on anyone who steps foot inside.

Space and negative space

In art, negative space is a space on the canvas intentionally left blank. For home design, negative space is an important aspect of decorating any room. Negative space in a home means a part of the room or wall that is left open, free of furniture, decorations, or clutter.

In practice, negative space serves two important functions. First, it creates a spacious atmosphere. Cluttered rooms typically have a negative effect on us, particularly over long periods of time. Rooms with negative space also tend to be let in more light, which improves the overall spaciousness of the room.

The second function of negative space is to draw attention to certain features of a room. On a wooded hilltop, you won’t notice just one tree. But on a hill with only one tree, it becomes easier to focus and appreciate that single tree. This rule also applies to the interior of your home. To showcase a piece of furniture or a painting on the wall, you’ll want to surround it with some negative space.

Balance and symmetry

Two concepts that hold true in different types of design are the usefulness of balance and symmetry, and understanding when it’s okay to break the rules (make a room asymmetrical).

Having symmetry around your dining room table is usually a good idea. You want the same number of chairs on each side and you want the chairs to match. However, when choosing living room furniture, asymmetrical design can come in handy when pairing a couch with two armchairs.

What does it mean to balance a room? Take a look around your kitchen and living room. Are there some items that are much taller than others? Are some items crowded into one corner? It may become habit to simply place items wherever they fit, but sometimes it’s a better option to rearrange furniture to create vertical and horizontal balance.

Create a color palette

The colors of your home are of utmost importance when it comes to creating a good design. One good way to prepare for color issues is to create color palettes for your home--one for each room, and one master palette. Doing this will help you choose furniture, paint, and decorations that will not only look good in each room, but will flow as you walk through the house.

As a home seller, your goal is to optimize your property sale earnings. Yet doing so may prove to be difficult, particularly for those who are operating in a fierce real estate market. Lucky for you, we're here to help you differentiate your residence from the competition and boost the likelihood of a profitable home selling experience.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you optimize your home sale earnings.

1. Enhance Your House's Curb Appeal

How homebuyers perceive your residence when they view it for the first time may impact your ability to maximize your home sale earnings. If buyers see a home with a pristine front lawn, dazzling garden and other stunning exterior features, they may set up home showings right away. Then, after buyers see all that your residence has to offer, they may submit homebuying proposals that match or exceed your expectations.

Ultimately, your house's curb appeal can make a world of difference during the home selling journey. If you allocate time and resources to trim the hedges, mow the lawn and perform other home exterior upgrades, you can boost your residence's curb appeal in no time at all.

2. Remove Clutter from Inside Your Home

Although you may have collected many antiques, paintings and knick-knacks over the years, these items may actually do more harm than good when you try to sell your house. In fact, your personal belongings may make it tough for buyers to envision what life may be like if they purchase your home.

Oftentimes, it helps to rent a storage unit before you list your residence. This will enable you to keep assorted personal belongings safe and outside your home until your residence sells.

You also may want to host a yard sale or list items online prior to selling your house. This will allow you to simultaneously remove clutter from your house and earn extra cash.

3. Hire a Real Estate Agent

For home sellers who want to maximize their home sale earnings, it pays to hire a real estate agent. This housing market professional will work with you throughout the home selling journey to ensure you can get the best price for your home.

Typically, a real estate agent will meet with you, learn about your house and craft a home selling strategy. He or she then will host home showings and open house events to promote your residence to potential buyers. And if a buyer submits an offer to purchase your house, a real estate agent can provide a recommendation about whether you should accept, reject or counter this proposal.

A real estate agent can respond to your home selling concerns and questions too. As a result, he or she can help you make informed decisions throughout the home selling journey.

Ready to list your home? Use the aforementioned tips, and you should have no trouble enjoying a quick and profitable home selling experience.

Shopping for a home is a long, arduous process. When you finally find one that you love, think you can afford, and spend the time to formulate an offer, it can be crushing when your offer is rejected.

However, getting rejected is simply part of the process. If you’ve ever applied to college, you might be familiar with this process. You send out applications that you poured your heart and soul into. Sometimes to get accepted, other times you don’t.

Making an offer on a home comes with one big advantage over those college applications, however--the opportunity to negotiate. As long as the house is still on the market after your offer is rejected, you’re still in the game.

In this article, we’re going to talk you through what to do when your offer is rejected so you can reformulate your plan and make the best decision as to moving forward.

1. Don’t sweat it

One of the most common fallacies we fall into as humans is to think the outcome is worse than it really is. First, remember that there are most likely other houses out there that are as good if not better than the one you are bidding on, even if they’re not for sale at this moment.

Next, consider the rejection as simply part of the negotiation process. Most people are turned off by rejection. However, you can learn a lot when a seller says no. In many cases, you can take what you learned and return to the drawing board to come up with a better offer.

Don’t spend too much time scrutinizing the seller’s decision. Ninety-nine percent of the time their decision isn’t personal. You simply haven’t met the pricing or contractual requirements that they and their agent have decided on.

2. Reconsider your offer

Now it’s time to start thinking about a second offer. If the seller didn’t respond with a counteroffer it can mean one of two things. First, they might be considering other buyers who have gotten closer to their requirements. Alternatively, your offer may have been too low or have had too many contingencies for them to consider.

Regardless, a flat-out rejection usually means changes need to be made before following up.

3. Making a new offer

This is your chance to take what you learned and apply it to your new offer. Make sure you meet the following prerequisites before sending out your next offer:

  • Double check your financing. Understand your spending limits, both on paper and in terms of what you’re comfortable spending.

  • Check comparable houses. If houses in the neighborhood are selling for more than they were when the house was previously listed, the seller might be compensating for that change.

  • Make sure you’re pre-approved. Your offer will be taken more seriously if you have the bank’s approval.

  • Remove unnecessary contingencies. It’s a seller’s market. Having a complicated contract will make sellers less likely to consider your offer.

4. Move on with confidence

Sometimes you just can’t make it up to the seller’s price point. Other times the seller just can’t come to terms with a reasonable price for their home. Regardless, don’t waste too much time negotiating and renegotiating. Take what you learned from this experience and use it toward the next house negotiation--it will be here sooner than you think!